Grapvine-Colleyville Independent School District
Colleyville Heritage High School

AP Human Geography and Global Studies Syllabus

 

The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice

 

Course Objectives

1.      Students will prepare to do acceptable work on the AP Human Geography Examination.

2.      Students will study the major core concepts and theories of human geography.  They will be able to define key terms and use them in their everyday vocabulary.

3.      Students will develop critical thinking skills.

4.      Students will build their reading, writing and discussion skills as well as learn about human geography. 

 

Textbook

An Introduction to Human Geography: The Cultural Landscape by James M. Rubenstein

 

Grading Procedure

Tests/Projects 70%

Quiz/Daily/Etc.  30%

 

* Please note that all tests, quizzes and map tests will be timed

 

Teachers Resources

The Power of Place: Geography for the 21stCentury- Annenberg Series with Harm DeBlij

Human Geography. (5th edition).McGraw-Hill, 2005

AP Human Geography Workbook, (2ndEdition).  WoodYard Publication, 2009.

Human Geography: People, Place and Culture. (9thedition).  Wiley, 2009.

Electronic resources including: The Economist, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Foreign Policy Magazine, The Week Magazine, Maps101

 

Homework

Students will need to read each chapter and make an outline as discussed in class. There will be an open-notes vocabulary quiz over each chapter two class periods after it is assigned. Chapter tests focus on reading comprehension; students can’t just rely on lectures for testing success.

 

 

Course Plan

Individual calendars will be available for each six weeks.  Students are responsible for knowing the dates of assignments or assessments and for coming to class prepared with any notes or handouts that are to be printed.  *If it is a hardship for any reason for you or your student to be able to print notes and handouts, please speak to me ahead of time so that we can make arrangements. 

 

 

I.  Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .5–10%

A.    Geography as a field of inquiry

B.      Evolution of key geographical concepts and models associated

C.    Key concepts underlying the geographical perspective: location, space,place, scale, pattern, regionalization, and globalization

D.    Key geographical skills

1.   How to use and think about maps and spatial data

2.   How to understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places

3.   How to recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes

4.   How to define regions and evaluate the regionalization process

5.   How to characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places

E.     New geographic technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, and GPS

F.     Sources of geographical ideas and data: the field, census data,and satellite imagery

 

II. Population  . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .13–17%

A.    Geographical analysis of population

1.   Density, distribution, and scale

2.   Implications of various densities and distributions

3.   Patterns of composition: age, sex, race, and ethnicity

4.   Population and natural hazards: past, present, and future

B.     Population growth and decline over time and space

1.   Historical trends and projections for the future

2.   Theories of population growth, including the Demographic Transition Model

3.   Patterns of fertility, mortality, and health

4.   Regional variations of demographic transitions

5.   Effects of population policies

C.    Population movement

1.   Migration selectivity

2.   Major voluntary and involuntary migrations at different scales

3.   Theories of migration, including push and pull factors,human capital, and life course

4.   International migration and refugees

5.   Socioeconomic consequences of migration

 

III.           Cultural Patterns and Processes . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–17%

A.    Concepts of culture

1.   Traits

2.   Diffusion

3.   Acculturation, Assimilation, and Globalization

4.   Cultural regions

B.     Cultural differences

1.   Language

2.   Religion

3.   Ethnicity

4.   Gender

5.   Popular and folk culture

C.    Cultural landscapes and cultural identity

1.   Values and preferences

2.   Symbolic landscapes and sense of place

3.    Environmental impact of cultural attitudes and practices

 

IV.           Political Organization of Space . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–17%

A.    Territorial dimensions of politics

1.   The concept of territoriality

2.   The nature and meaning of boundaries

3.   Influences of boundaries on identity, interaction, and exchange

4.   Federal and unitary states

5.   Spatial relationships between political patterns and patterns of ethnicity, economy, and environment

B.     Evolution of the contemporary political pattern

1.   The nation-state concept

2.   Colonialism and imperialism

3.   Democratization

C.    Changes and challenges to political–territorial arrangements

1.   Changing nature of sovereignty

2.   Fragmentation, unification, alliance

3.   Supranationalism and devolution

4.   Electoral geography, including gerrymandering

5.   Terrorism

 

V.Agriculture and Rural Land Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–17%

A.    Development and diffusion of agriculture

1.   Neolithic

2.   Agricultural Revolution

3.   Second Agricultural Revolution

4.   Green Revolution

5.   Modern Commercial Agriculture

B.     Major agricultural production regions

1.   Agricultural systems associated with major bioclimatic zones

2.   Variations within major zones and effects of markets

3.   Linkages and flows among regions of food production and consumption

C.    Rural land use and settlement patterns

1.   Models of agricultural land use, including von Thünen’s model

2.   Settlement patterns associated with major agriculture types

3.   Land use/land cover change, irrigation, conservation(desertification, deforestation)

D.    Modern commercial agriculture

1.   Biotechnology, including genetically modified plants and animals

2.   Spatial organization and diffusion of industrial agriculture

3.   Organic farming and local food production

4.   Environmental impacts of agriculture

 

VI.           Industrialization and Economic Development  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .13–17%

A.    Growth and diffusion of industrialization

1.   The changing roles of energy and technology

2.   Industrial Revolution

3.   Evolution of economic cores and peripheries

4.   Geographic critiques of models of economic localization (i .e .,bid rent, comparative costs of transportation), industrial location, economic development,and world systems

B.     Contemporary patterns and impacts of industrialization and development

1.   Spatial organization of the world economy

2.   Variations in levels of development

3.   Deindustrialization and economic restructuring

4.   Globalization and international division of labor

5.   Natural resources and environmental concerns

6.   Sustainable development

7.   Local development initiatives: government policies

8.   Women in development

 

VII.         Cities and Urban Land Use . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–17%

A.    Development and character of cities

1.   Origin of cities

2.   Rural–urban migration and urban growth

3.   Global cities and megacities

4.   Suburbanization and edge cities

B.     Models of urban systems

1.   Rank-size rule

2.   Central place theory

3.   Gravity model

C.    Models of internal city structure

1.   Concentric zone model  

2.   Sector model

3.   Multiple-nuclei model

4.   Changing employment mix

5.   Changing demographic and social structures

6.   Uneven development, ghettoization, and gentrification

D.    Built environment and social space

1.   Housing

2.   Transportation and infrastructure

3.   Political organization of urban areas

4.   Urban planning and design

5.   Patterns of race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status

Last Modified on August 24, 2012