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     AVID
     Socratic Seminar Philosophical Chairs  
     

     

     Middle School High School
     
    6th grade
    1. Introduce the basic components of Philosophical Chairs and Socratic Seminars using topics based on student interest
    2. Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by an author and a biography of the same person) in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion
    3. Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively), as well as in words, to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion. 

    7th grade

    1. Actively participate in and evaluate the process of Philosophical Chairs and/or Socratic Seminar, selecting topics/articles as appropriate
    2. Analyze how two or more authors, writing about the same topic, shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion
    3. Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words) in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion

    8th grade

    1. Actively participate in and evaluate the process of Philosophical Chairs and/or Socratic Seminar, focusing on strategies for continuous improvement
    2. Reference text, citing location to support claims and questions
    3. Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion
    4. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion    

     

    9th grade

    1. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision‐making
    2. Analyze a seminal U.S document of historical and literary significance (e.g., the Gettysburg Address, Washington's Farewell Address) in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion
    3. Utilize critical reading strategies to identify authors’ claims and formulate questions to explore meaning as preparation for a Socratic Seminar
    4. During the Socratic Seminar, ask additional questions to continue deeper exploration of the text and one another’s thinking and expressions
    5. Reflect on the Socratic Seminar discussion and identify areas for future improvement

    10th grade

    1. Utilize critical reading strategies to determine main ideas/claims as a pre‐activity to Socratic Seminar and Philosophical Chairs discussions
    2. Come to Socratic Seminar/Philosophical Chairs discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study and explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts
    3. Analyze a seminal U.S document of historical and literary significance in a Socratic Seminar or
    4. Philosophical Chairs discussion
    5. Analyze various accounts of a subject told through different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account in a Socratic
    6. Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion
    7. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussions to broader themes or larger ideas
    8. Focus on the development of leadership skills and self‐refinement during Soc. Seminar discussions
    9. Summarize points of agreement and disagreement

    11th grade

    1. Students provide the central statement for Philosophical Chairs
    2. Formulate questions to make a personal connection with text(s) and/or other content/concepts
    3. Evaluate ideas/points of view within the discussion and generate/construct appropriate responses
    4. Appreciate multiple perspectives, in order to negotiate multiple meanings or ideas during the
    5. discussion
    6. Prepare an academic argument on a controversial topic, integrating fully developed claims
    7. Analyze a 17th, 18th, or 19th century foundational U.S document of historical and literary significance (e.g., The Declaration of Independence or the Preamble to the Constitution) for their themes, purposes and rhetorical features in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion

    12th grade

    1. Students select their own topics for Socratic Seminar/Philosophical Chairs discussions
    2. Integrate a variety of source evidence to support position statements
    3. Articulate a more thorough understanding of the topic, based on the discussion
    4. Take an active leadership role that results in higher levels of thinking and comprehension
    5. Analyze a 17th, 18th, or 19th century foundational U.S document of historical and literary significance for themes, purposes and rhetorical features in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion
    6. Integrate and evaluate multiple courses of information presented in different media or formats(e.g., visually, quantitatively), as well as in words, in order to address a question or solve a problem in a Socratic Seminar or Philosophical Chairs discussion     
     
Last Modified on December 5, 2012