Grading Cycles FAQs

  • What are the benefits of the nine-week grading cycle versus what we were already doing? 
    By changing the grading cycles to nine weeks instead of six, there are several benefits that our students, parents and staff will see. This change would:
    • Provide teachers more opportunity for student assessment of learning, rather than having fewer number of assignments that are weighted heavier towards a course grade. 
    • Provide parents an opportunity to see if a student is underperforming in a course by providing two progress reports, as opposed to only one, before a report card is sent home.
    • Align the grading cycles with our elementary schools to provide further consistency in our grade reporting to parents.
     
    How would the semester grades be calculated on a nine-week grading cycle?
    In the current six-week cycle, each report card counts 28.5 percent towards a semester grade and the semester exam is worth 14.5 percent. By moving to a nine-week grading cycle, each report card will count 42.5 percent and the final exam will count for 15 percent.
     
    How would this impact eligibility for sports and extracurricular activities? 
    Changing to a nine-week grading cycle would have no impact on extracurricular eligibility. According to the University Interscholastic League (UIL), schools that are on a nine-week grading cycle must check grades at the end of the first six weeks of the school year for eligibility (which would be the second progress report of the first grading cycle of the year). The next grade check would then occur at the end of the nine-week grading cycle. After the first nine-week grading cycle, eligilibity checks would occur at each report period thereafter. This is the same schedule that we are now using to perform eligibility grade checks, so nothing would change.
     
    Will this impact top 10 percent and calculation of GPA? If yes, how? 
    While this does not directly impact the top 10 percent and calculation of GPA, each report card would now be weighted heavier than when we had a six-week cycle. In the current six-week cycle, each report card counts 28.5 percent towards a semester grade and the semester exam is worth 14.5 percent. By moving to a nine-week grading cycle, each report card will count 42.5 percent and the final exam will count for 15 percent. 
     
    To view the proposed grading calendar for the 2015-2016 school year, click here.